Mon, 23 Sep 2019

French President Emmanuel Macron is hosting his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, for talks expected to focus on efforts to advance negotiations to curb the conflict between Ukrainian forces and Moscow-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine.

Macron, who held talks with Putin at the Palace of Versailles near Paris in 2017, this time welcomed him at his summer retreat at Bregancon Fort, near the village of Bormes-les-Mimosas.

At the start of the meeting, Macron said he hoped his talks with Putin will lead to a four-way summit on the crisis in Ukraine over the coming weeks, instating that there was a 'real opportunity' for peace.

The Russian president voiced support for the Normandy format for negotiations aimed at putting an end to the Ukrainian conflict and involving France, Germany, Ukraine, and Russia.

But he said that phone conversations with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy had given him 'cautious' grounds for optimism.

Macron said he will also discuss with Putin ways to deescalate tensions surrounding Iran's nuclear program, the Syria conflict, and arms-control issues. The French president called for the respect of free speech and fair elections in Russia.

The meeting comes after Zelenskiy earlier this month urged Putin to help halt the conflict in eastern Ukraine, where fighting between government forces and Russian-backed separatists has killed more than 13,000 people since April 2014.

Insisting that peace can be returned to Ukraine only by way of diplomacy, Zelenskiy has also called for a new round of talks within the Normandy format for negotiations aimed at putting an end to the war. The format involves France, Germany, Ukraine, and Russia.

'President Zelenskiy has made offers to which -- it seems to us -- President Putin should respond in an encouraging way,' AFP news agency quoted a French official as saying on condition of anonymity.

Zelenskiy's election in April 'gives us some room to maneuver,' the official added.

Kremlin foreign-policy aide Yury Ushakov said that the dialogue between Moscow and Paris had 'intensified' in recent months and that Putin's visit to France was the 'logical continuation' of his contacts with Macron.

Macron announced in June he planned to host Putin 'in order to explore all the forms of cooperation on key topics of destabilization or conflict, without naivety but without closing the door.'

Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in March 2014. Shortly thereafter, Moscow began supporting separatists in the eastern Ukrainian regions of Donetsk and Luhansk.

Cease-fire road maps announced as part of the Minsk accords -- in September 2014 and February 2015 pacts -- have contributed to a decrease in fighting in eastern Ukraine but have failed to hold.

Putin's visit to southern France comes days before Macron and other world leaders are set to gather in the southwestern city of Biarritz on August 24-26 for a Group of Seven (G7) summit.

France holds the presidency of the G7 this year. The grouping also includes Britain, Canada, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United States.

Russia was part of what was called the G8, but it was thrown out following its seizure of Crimea.

At Bregancon Fort, Putin said that Russia 'would not refuse' working within the previous G8 format, adding, 'Any contacts with our partners, in any format, are useful.'

With reporting by AFP and Reuters

Copyright (c) 2018. RFE/RL, Inc. Republished with the permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave NW, Ste 400, Washington DC 20036

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